Snowboard Binding Size Chart

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boots sizingSnowboards Guide

Finding the correct size of bindings is fairly easy because they only really come in a few different sizes. The standard sizes are small, small-medium, medium, medium-large and extra-large. You know your bindings fit correctly if your boots fit securely in your bindings with little space on either side of your feet and your toes and heels reach to just about the edges of your board while strapped in. Once again, all components in your snowboard setup should complement your riding style and terrain choice. Freestyle bindings usually consist of a more forgiving flex. A softer binding is good for mad tweakability and mobility when getting down in the park or street. These bindings also happen to be lighter designs to help make trick execution smoother. Lightweight bindings with some flex are also good for beginners. Stiffer bindings are meant to transmit rapid and powerful response to your snowboard’s edges. People who do a lot of freeriding choose to use stiff bindings for total control when sending it at high speeds or through powder. Refer to the snowboard binding size chart below to find the proper size for you. Keep in mind that all manufactures and models vary and each may have their own unique fit.

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Foot Length Boot Size
7.0 inches 1
7.5 inches 2
8.0 inches 3
8.5 inches 4
9.0 inches 5
9.5 inches 6
10 inches 7

Binding Flex

Binding Flex

Soft Flex Bindings


Freestyle bindings usually consist of a more forgiving flex.  A softer binding is good for mad tweakability and mobility when getting down in the park or street.  These bindings also happen to be lighter designs to help make trick execution smoother.  Lightweight bindings with a softer flex is also good for beginners.

Medium Flex Bindings

Right in the middle of the pack, of course, is the medium flex binding.  A medium flex binding is great for all mountain riding because they offer a perfect amount of response and forgiveness for all type of riding styles and terrain types.

Stiff Flex Bindings

Stiff flex bindings are meant to transmit rapid and powerful response to your snowboard’s edges.  People who do a lot of freeriding or pipe riding choose to use stiff bindings for total control when sending it at high speeds.

Refer to the snowboard binding size chart below to find the proper size for you. Keep in mind that all manufactures and models vary and each may have their own unique fit.

Binding Types

Snowboarding has seen plenty of binding designs. While some types of bindings have become obsolete over the years, but new binding technologies are developed every season. Bindings are no longer just something to hold your feet onto your board. They are a genuine piece of equipment that can really make a difference in your riding.

Below is a description of two popular binding types that are often utilized by many riders of all riding types. There are other less common binding types that you may also consider. Use this information as reference only and do not forget to incorporate your personal preference.
Traditional & Rear Entry Bindings
Traditional Strap Bindings

The traditionally designed strap bindings are a snowboard staple that can work well with both stiff boots and soft boots. They have been around for decades and show no sign of disappearing. This is no doubt the most commonly used type of binding on the market and for a few good reasons. Strap bindings can be easily entered and exited with a few clicks of a time-tested ratchet mechanism. This type of binding features two sets of straps per each binding that allow for a good amount of customization and a quality fit. The straps are also easily replaceable and usually less expensive than replacement components for other binding types.

Rear-Entry Bindings

With a similar look to the traditional strap bindings, rear-entry bindings actually operate quite differently. Rear-entry bindings, also known as speed-entry bindings, consist of a hinged highback that can fold backward for speedy in-and-out access. Once the front straps have been properly adjusted to your boots once, all you have to do is fold up the highback and your good-to-go. It’s a convenient binding design that takes the traditional strap design to another level. These bindings also operate well with both stiff and soft boots.

Compatibility

Ensure that your binding disc or baseplates are compatible with your board’s hole-pattern inserts. Some boards require a brand-specific baseplate like Burton’s 3D hole-pattern. Some companies offer some options when it comes to baseplates, but it is up to you, the consumer, to know what will work together and what won’t. You should also verify that your boots will fit into your new pair of bindings correctly. Your boots should fit somewhat snug into your bindings, leaving little space on either side of your foot. The straps of your bindings should also fit tightly across your boots without leaving room for your boot to rise out of the binding. Buying boots first to have something to reference for a measurement is a great idea.

Common Questions

What size bindings do i need?

Hopefully we answered that question above but bindings are probably the easiest element to choose for your arsenal. Bindings only come in a few different size options, but each size accommodates a range of boot sizes. This makes finding the right size binding a quick and easy process. A couple other things to look at while shopping are different types of binding entry systems and board/boot/binding compatibility. There are several types of bindings, most are similar and utilize the traditional strap system. Some bindings use a rear-entry system with an optional strapping option. Each system has pros and cons but it is really personal preference. Making sure all your gear is compatible is a good way to start looking at bindings. Make sure your bindings will cooperate with your boots. Some bindings have baseplates designed for very specific boards and will not work with all hole-patterns.

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